Back in late 2017 I was tasked with creating an interview video for the, at the time, soon-to-be-released Brent Hinds Terror amp. I’d sit down with Brent, guitarist and co-vocalist for the Grammy-winning metal band Mastodon, and we’d have a chat about the work that went into creating his first signature guitar head. I’ve worked with Brent for almost a decade and quite frankly I’m one of the only people that seems capable of getting him to sit down for an hour to capture an interview.

When it comes to Brent, very little is ever scripted. He just doesn’t operate that way. In fact, most of the time he shows contempt when you give him too much input. Instead, you give him a vague idea and he does the rest, even if “the rest” doesn’t result in usable content. Editing is definitely important in these situations.

About 30 minutes into the official interview it dawned on me that we weren’t going in the right direction. That’s when Brent threw out the idea of having me “get mad” at him on camera. I’d be telling him exactly what to say, he’d say it the wrong way, and then I’d get upset and scream his line back at him. It resulted in a hilarious back and forth that actually resulted in Brent giving us MORE usable content than ever before. Breaking from the standard interview format relaxed him enough that we were able to delve deeper into his psyche. Many people told me that we got one of the best, most serious interviews out of Brent they’ve ever seen (despite the fact it starts off so fake and kooky).

With that said, I wanted to show you the outtakes from that day of filming. This is all unscripted and it’s very “classic Brent.” We only used about 1 second of this footage in the final cut, out of roughly 20 minutes of Brent doing random stuff on camera. Enjoy!

Once again we’ve made it through to March and this year’s International Women’s Day. Haters might say we don’t need it, and how can we be equal if men don’t men have a day of their own? Well, men don’t tend to get grabbed and get abuse shouted at them when walking down the street, they don’t get paid less because of their gender, and you know, they don’t have to give birth either so, yeah, we kinda deserve this day – we can grow a human inside us but in some eyes not even that makes us good enough, yikes! Anyway – enough politics for our end, let’s chat music.

At Orange we’ve got quite a few women working for the company such as myself, my name is Ella and I do freelance content creation and artist relations, plus a bunch of other ladies in our offices keeping this ship afloat as well as the wonderful female artists we endorse. Now, there might not be a secret that rock and guitar music might be slightly more male dominated but that doesn’t mean that it’s a boys club, there’s a bunch of rad ladies out there, and today we’ll be shining a light on a few of them:

Orianthi

Rockerverb 50 MKIII
PPC412

Orianthi’s got a pretty spectacularly impressive resume, having performed for Steve Vai at the age of 15, and been asked to jam on stage with Carlos Santana at 18. Her big breakthrough came in 2009 when she played lead guitar for Carrie Underwood at the Grammys, which led to Michael Jackson reaching out to her, inviting her to join his band for his “This is it” concert series, which unfortunately fell through due to his death. Since then, she’s played with Alice Cooper, as well as releasing various solo albums as well as winning the award for “Breakthrough Guitarist of the Year” 2010 by Guitar International Magazine.

Hannah Wicklund, Hannah Wicklund & The Steppin’ Stones

Rocker 30

Despite her young age of 21, Hannah Wiklund, the soulful blues guitarist that could probably fit the description of the love child Janis Joplin and Hendrix never had, has got a remarkable 2000 shows behind her. Hannah was gifted a guitar from her dad an an early age, and had her first ever The Steppin’ Stones band practice back in 2005, with the first ever song they played being Neil Young’s “Rockin’ in the Free World.” By the time she finished high school at 16 they had already played over a thousand gigs together. The band released their debut album last year, and are currently touring and gigging, as they’ve always done.

Thao Nguyen, Thao & the Get Down Stay Down

AD30

Thao Nguyen is a guitarist and banjo player and the front woman of Thao & the Get Down Stay Down, a San Francisco based alternative folk rock band. She started playing music around the age of 11, and ended up starting a country pop duo with one of her friends. Shortly after she began performing acoustic solo shows, before eventually forming Thao & the Get Down Stay Down with fellow students. Thao’s lyrics are often about relationships and childhood, with some crossing over into politics. She has also been featured in the 2017 documentary “Nobody Dies: A Film about a Musician, Her Mom and Vietnam”, which follows Thao and her mum as they visit Vietnam, Thao for the first time, and her mum for the first time since the Vietnam war, where she is faced with the two conflicting cultures that helped shape her and her music.

Laura Cox, The Laura Cox Band

Micro Dark
Rockerverb 50 MKIII
Dual Terror
PPC212OB
PPC112

Laura’s career got a kickstart in 2008 after joining Youtube and sharing videos of herself playing guitar, the response was overwhelming and she quickly built up a following which has now reached over 363k followers and 80 million views. Due to her online success, she formed The Laura Cox Band, which is influenced by Southern legends Lynyrd Skynyrd and ZZ Top as well as Aussie rockers AC/DC. There was no other musicians in her family when she was growing up, but hearing her dad play Dire Straits and AC/DC records she felt inspired and intrigued to play that music herself, and was shortly after gifted a guitar for Christmas. The rest is, as they say, history.

Becky Blomfield, Milk Teeth

OB1-500
OBC810

MILK TEETH bassist Becky grew up in a music loving household with a musical and saxophone playing dad who regularly  However, it wasn’t until the age of 11 that she found her own taste thanks to bands such as Nirvana and Smashing Pumpkins, which are two of the bands that led here to where she is today. Influenced by the above, punk band MILK TEETH was born in 2013 and have been playing together ever since, although with a few line up changes along they way. The band’s latest release is the single “Stain” which was out just before Christmas, and brings to mind bands such as Hole and Nirvana.

Hey my name is Pepper Keenan and I play guitar and sing in a band called Corrosion of Conformity and I highly love my Orange amps!

Clearly when I think of Orange I think of the 60’s,70’s coolness factor of Orange amps. They were unobtainable things when I was a kid and I knew if I ever could reach out to that, get to that level that would be an amp that I would love.

The first time I tried out the Orange Thunderverb 50 I was actually at the NAMM show in California, I plugged into that thing and it was just instantly, raked a G chord and it was a classy sounding, right out of the gate, no pedals, real deal amp. You could feel it, you could tell and the simplicity was what I liked with it the most. The tone, you could tell somebody had put some thought into it, it felt like a handwired amp.

It’s done extremely well, I would put it against anybody. The way I play guitar, it really gives back what you lean into it with, its top of the line amplifier. It’s designed well but the shape knob got me, I don’t even know what the shape knob does but I know if i turn it this way it sounds like “Master of Puppets” and if i turn it this way it sounds like Tom Petty.

They ain’t broke yet! They are consistent, once I had that thing, I kind of felt like prior, the other amps I was using I kind of felt I was getting ripped off! Something was missing. The sustain, the whole nine yards, it really articulates what I think i am as a guitar player.

For me the way an amp is with Orange, the analogue thing about it, you open up an Orange amps and it’s just a bunch of wires, tubes and there isn’t much to it but its done well. I do think there is a degree of that era of amp making that goes with the sound of the rock that you are playing. Even so far as some of the pedals you use go in line with that amp. In terms of sounding real and like bands that I dig, that’s it, it’s got it.

I have been Orange amps for a very long time and i think without a doubt it is one of the most quality made amplifiers out there. And if you need something to get your point across, there ain’t nothing better than an Orange amp. You can ask just about anybody!

There is one thing we love more than anything else and that is rock ’n’ roll, in all shapes and sizes – we love it, can’t get enough. Without rock ’n’ roll, we wouldn’t be where we are today, and we owe everything to this beautiful genre and it’s offsprings. We like to take this opportunity to shine a light on a few (of many) rock bands and artists on our roster today.

Billy Gibbins, ZZ Top

Bax Bangeetar
Micro Dark

Another legendary guitarist making their way into this article is ZZ Top guitarist Billy Gibbons. Gibbons started his career in The Moving Sidewalks as a young teen, a band that landed shows supporting bands and artists such as Jimi Hendrix and The Doors – he then went on to forming ZZ Top in the late sixties alongside bassist Dusty Hill and drummer Frank Beard (who funnily enough is the only member without a beard), which remains the standing line up of the band today nearly fifty years later.

Throughout his time in the band, Gibbons have become a massive name among respected guitar players, and again and again produces quality blues infused rock albums whether it’s with the ZZ Top or as a recording solo artist. Latest one out is his solo project “The Big Bad Blues” released September 2018, which just adds to his already impressive resume. Billy Gibbons is a master bluesman, to say the least. Gibbons is not a big user of pedal, so we were particularly pleased when he took a liking to our Bax Bangeetar pedal which he uses both live and in the studio.

Phil Campbell, Phil Campbell and the Bastard Sons

Phil Campbell is first and foremost known as the former guitarist of legendary speed rock band Motörhead. His career in the band lasted for 31 years, which he pretty much spent on the road touring or in the studio recording. Sadly, the band’s disbanded in 2015 after the tragic passing of frontman Lemmy. Since then, Phil has formed his own band “Phil Campbell and the Bastard Sons” with three of his actual sons, almost a family business much like our own, sort of.

Rune Rebellion, Turbonegro

AD30HTC x 2
Rockerverb100
Turbonegro kind of came out of the Norwegian woods having created their own sort of genre called “Denim Death Punk”, which is pretty close to what we call rock ’n’ roll hence why we’re allowing them on our list. Turbonegro were initially formed in the late eighties and kept it going for about a decade, before a three year long hiatus. Luckily, to the joy of Turbojugends across the world the band got back together and kept releasing music. Rune’s one of the founding members of the band, and has been a constant member with the exception of a few years which we’re choosing to ignore. Watching Turbonegro live is in many ways the most masculine and feminine thing you’ll ever see all at once – middle-aged men in daisy dukes, sailor hats and make up, playing sweet rock ’n’ roll to a bunch shirtless dude and women (although they tend to keep their shirts on) – few bands throw a party like Turbonegro. Rune’s been using Orange for about 15 years now both live and in studio, and tends to stay clear of effects, as “The Rockerverb sound provides him with the softness of classic rock mixed with the modern hard rock growl which is perfect for the full on Turbonegro guitar attack.” – Rune Rebellion.

Scott Holiday, Rival Sons

OR15
Acoustic Pre
Custom Shop 50
PPC412

PPC212

Some people say rock ’n’ roll is going, so whenever a band such as Rival Sons comes up it makes us happy as it means we can prove people wrong. Rival Sons are one of those bands that are kind of ticking all the boxes for a classic rock band, but with a modern twist – they have the anthems as well as the ballads, a killer frontman who can play the tambourine and look super fly while doing so, which is pretty rare in 2019, and they have Scott Holiday and his magician moustache. Scott’s all about the big sounds, and with the “killer and colourful heritage and history, healthy list of some of the greatest players ever and the high quality of current amps and cabs, Orange was an easy choice.” – Scott Holiday.

Danava, Peter Hughes

Rockerverb 50
OR100
PPC412 x 2
Peter Hughes, the classically trained and exceptionally skilled guitarist of heavy rock ’n’ roll bands Danava and Sons of Huns. Peter got his hands on his first ever Orange (which was a Rockerverb 50 combo) back in 2007 having just graduated the Willamette University with a Bachelor of Music degree in Classical Guitar performance. It didn’t take longs before he had his hands full playing for both bands, venturing far away from the classical sounds but bringing along all the tricks of the trade to the table, now catering for a new audience with his high paced and heavy rock ’n’ roll which would suit fans for the likes of Motorhead and Thin Lizzy. Since then, he’s become an official Orange ambassador and acquired a few more pieces to his rig in the form of two PPC412 cabs and an OR100. When Peter isn’t playing his Orange amplifier at excessive decibels, he enjoys “plucking out the Baroque stylings of the one and only J.S. Bach on Classical Guitar”, as well as being a amateur mycologist, or a fungi enthusiast.

Once again Desertfest London has gone and done it and put together yet another cracking lineup for this year’s festival featuring bands and artists such as OM, Fu Manchu, Earthless, All Them Witches, Kadavar, Electric Citizen, Witch and more. We might still be a while away, but we’re impatiently waiting as we count down for the festivities to begin.

The festival is held every so slightly later than usual this year as it’s taking place over the weekend 3rd to 5th of May, and as spring should have properly sprung by this point we’re hoping for even sunnier conditions than last year – there is just something beautiful about casually bumping into about 98% of the people you know drinking sunny pints at 3.45 on a Friday in the designated Desertfest area outside the Black Heart, browsing through records and merch while chatting along. 

Desertfest means madness to us at Orange, and we’d probably all clone ourselves if we could to stretch out between the different venues to catch all the bands as well as conducting all the interviews, shoots and unsuccessfully trying to upload Instagram stories while in our favourite but 4G-less basement at The Underworld. In many ways, it’s very much like a wedding, our wedding – lots of planning and excitement during the months leading up to it, until day one’s all of a sudden there and you’re jet launched into an overwhelming experience of people to talk to and a gallon of booze thrown into the mix. Not your average day in the office, and sometimes it’s hard to differ between working hard or hardly working – somehow the two go hand in hand delightfully during this weekend.

As always, there’s always some acts that excite me to the point of explosion, last year it was Hawkwind who’s set timed perfectly with me finishing all interviews for the weekend, allowing embrace the space and go full Rainbow Rhythms in the crowd during their set. This year I’ve got my heart set on Earthless at The Roundhouse despite having seen them a whole bunch a times before, the last one being at Brighton’s The Haunt where I for a second thought I’d take off into hyperspace during the 20 minute long into. My heart sings for Earthless, the finest psych connoisseurs and masters of their instruments, and some of the kindest people in the industry. I spoke to guitarist Isaiah about his expectations towards the gig, and being one of the bands chosen to close the festival at Roundhouse on the Sunday;

Earthless at Islington Assembly Hall April 2018

“We’re stoked and honoured and excited to be playing with all these bands that we love, and to play a venue such as the Roundhouse makes the whole thing even sweeter! We can’t wait to get to London and let it all out.”
– Isaiah Mitchell, Earthless

Another band I’m genuinely stoked to see at the Roundhouse is All Them Witches – having first seen the band play London’s Lexington just three years ago it’s incredible to think how much they’ve grown during those years, from Lexington to Scala to Koko to the Roundhouse – almost sounds like a classic case of “dreams come true”. Having recently parted with their keyboard player the band is now performing as a three piece, so seeing how they’ve adapted their music to be performed one man down is pretty exciting. Everyone loves a power trio, and ATW might just be the next big one.

Day passes and weekend tickets are up for grabs via Desertfest London’s website, so get your hands on yours before it’s too late.

Sean: Hello I’m Sean and I play guitar in the band Shame.

Josh: My name is Josh and I play bass.

Eddie: I’m Eddie from Shame, I play guitar.

Sean: On the amp I pretty much only use the natural channel, if i’m not using in combination with another amp I will probably use the dirty channel, just to give it a bit more drive. But I usually get that from my pedals, I like a clean tone as a base.

Eddie: Live I’m using the Tiny Terror channel but when we have been in our rehearsal studio i’ve been using the Fat channel and I have been experimenting with that. For me it’s a lot more accessible than a lot of other amps because i’m not really into the whole EQ’s on amps thing, I have an EQ pedal. I prefer to work from my pedal board rather than the control settings of my amp and for me Orange really works great for that because it’s quite simple.

Sean: I would say the Rocker 32 is a base for it because you already get a full, round sound from just that one channel.

Sean uses the Rocker 32

Eddie: I think Orange amps are almost built for those guitars in a way, I think it really helps capture every element of it and really pushes the sound well. I am now playing a Telecaster with humbuckers, so I think having two Orange amps with guitars with humbuckers sounds really good. Obviously the differences in our pedal setups, there is a distinction when there needs to be a distinction but also our guitars can blend when they need to, which is a very important part of our sound.

Sean: This amp is perfect for me, as its just got one knob, just the one!

Josh: The controls of this amp are very easy to use, there is just a bass, mid, treble, which I like. I never really mess around with graphic EQ’s and stuff like that, so it’s perfect for me.

Josh uses the Terror Bass

Eddie: The simplicity was a really big, factor for me, they also just look like really iconic amps, it’s the sort of thing you associate with big stage shows. It’s just really iconic british tone.

Sean: One of the best things is its size because its only like this big and its really light. I’ve never been a big believer in needing a massive amp or a massive stack to get a good sound. I think simple is usually best for me. I say it translates really well, we have used it all across this year, like we used it on the main stage at Reading and that’s possibly the biggest stage you can play really, and then to smaller club shows in the UK and it’s just great.

I’d say for me Orange is all about the tone because there was a period when I destroyed my fuel tank on my pedal board when we were rehearsing for this tour. So we were just playing and this amp doesn’t have reverb and i was just playing through the clean channel with absolutely nothing on it and it just sounded brilliant. So I would say the tone, it’s the kind of amp, I mean I put pedals through it but it’s the kind of amp that you wouldn’t need to put anything through it to make it sound amazing.

I think I had always been scared, I kind of stick to what I knew, never really try anything else. But then we came in and played through it, it just sounded so much better, instantaneously. I think it is the simplistic aspect but also Orange does have a legacy, especially from Britpop in the 90’s.

Eddie: To be honest i’d always associated it for some reason with heavy bands and it might be just a visual thing with the amps being mostly really big cabs. I think the connotations of the name like Tiny Terror stuff conjures images of really heavy, hard rock bands. Since trying them, the versatility of the Orange equipment was definitely opened up more to me a lot more. I wasn’t expecting them to be able to offer a really nice warm clean tone but also handle gain really well, so it was a pleasant surprise.

For many of you Orange might be known as a stoner rock company, which, fair enough, is an easy assumption to make as we have quite a fair bit of heavy bands on our roster, and regularly share that picture, you know, THAT picture of Matt Pike with the stacks of amps across our Instagram. However, Orange is for everyone, and for example, in Japan, we’re known as a clean sounding company, now would ya believe it?! In the name of Orange and it’s diversity, let’s take a look at a few of our artists who are proudly sporting some clean Orange sound.

Tyler Bryant, Tyler Bryant and the Shakedown

Rockerverb MKIII

Guitarist Tyler Bryant of Tyler Bryant and the Shakedown fell for the blues at an early age, and moved to Nashville at the age of 17 to make music. He has since proven himself as an incredible musician, and have toured or played with bands and artists such as Jeff Beck, Aerosmith, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Joe Bonamassa and Guns ’N’ Roses. He’s released two albums and EPs with his band, and continues to tour and make music.

Graveyard, Truls Mörck

AD200
Sweden’s Gothenburg has almost become a mecca for this whole 70s revival thing with bands such as Graveyard, Horisont and Witchcraft making names for themselves far away from their Nordic borders. Truls was originally the guitarist of the band, but left after their first record to focus on different things. However, low and behold, a few years back the band saw yet another change of lineup and was this time in the need of a bassist. Truls joined the band again, and have now been playing with them for the past two records “Innocence & Decacence” and 2018´s “Peace”. Truls wasn’t too familiar with Orange when rejoining the band, but as former bassist Rikard was an avid Orange user it seemed natural to give it a go. Having tried a few different amps such as Ampeg and Fender, he eventually decided on Orange as it seemed like the best fit for the kinda music they were playing. “They’re pretty straightforward without too many buttons, so it’s quite easy to get good sound.

Grateful Dead, Bob Weir

Rocker 15
Bob Weir, founding member of ICONIC hippie psychedelic peace and love loving pioneers the Grateful Dead and the original acid granddad. It all started on new year’s eve in 1963 when a sixteen year old Bob heard banjo music played from Dana Morgan’s Music Store while he was wandering the streets of Palo Alto looking for a club that would let him and his other underage friend in. Intrigued by the music they were hearing, they were lured in to the store where a young Jerry Garcia was sat playing. Bob and Jerry ended up spending the night playing music together, and decided to form a band, which later saw them at the front of a hippie revolution. In 1994 he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame due to his time in Grateful Dead. He’s also played in various other bands such as Kingfish, Bobby and the Midnites, and RatDog, all while maintaining a solo career.

Bad Religion, Jay Bentley

4 Stroke

Jay Bentley is the bassist and one of the founding members of political Californian punk rock band Bad Religion, and have with the exception of a little break from ’83 to ’85 played with the bands since the formation in 1980. The band is known for their philosophical, social and politic lyrics and their vocal harmonies, and are considered to be one of the best-selling punk rock bands of all times, with more than five million albums sold worldwide. When not playing with Bad Religion, Jay has also been touring regularly with punk supergroup and cover band Me First and the Gimmie Gimmies, filling in for bass for Fat Mike.

Temples, Tom Warmsley

Tom Warmsley of Temples

OBC410

Formed in Northamptonshire in 2012 Temples kind of just exploded into the UK music scene with their neo psychedelic and modern take on classic British pop rock. After the release of their debut album “Sun Structures” in 2014 you couldn’t leave the house without hearing the single “Shelter Song” played relentlessly on every corner, and the album charted at number seven in the UK. Bassist Tom Warmsley is an Orange ambassador, and has this to say about our amps: “Orange amplification is as strikingly integral, alien, gorgeous and mysterious as it was in 1968, a true transition period of British amplificiation. In every instance of footage, the amps look as psychedelic as the bands playing through them.”

Alright, I’m Mike Vennart and I play guitar for my own band Vennart and I play guitar for Biffy Clyro.

I look for articulation more than anything, I think it is fair to say when your playing through an amp or when you are trying any instrument or anything like that. If it brings the best out of you then it is a source of inspiration. What I need personally on a very specific level is a clean sound that is articulate, defined, really crystal clear, really brings the most out of each individual note attack but will then act as a great foundation for pedals.

Check out the full video.

What’s great about the amps I use with Orange is the distortion is a very thick distortion, you get a very warm, full articulate sound. But the clean is of equal importance for me. So there is an awful lot of things that I need but with Orange they are incredibly simple. This one has got six knobs on it and yet for such little control, it does so much, it does everything i need it to do.

This guitar in particular is a weird beast because you have this big hard rock humbucker at the back and this really vintage sounding single coil at the front. With that there is a lot of sounds in there and with a lot of amps, they can’t really cope with this mismatched idea. But the Orange, I play everything from really detuned heavy riffs to really spangly, jangly wiry clean stuff that I love and I need an amp that can cut it and do those different things. To be honest most of the amps I have tried can’t.

I decided that the Retro 50 was the amp for me after I went to see Pavement several times over the period of a year, as I am a big Pavement fan. Everytime I came away saying “What is that guitar sound?” Not only was the clean full and very precise but it was nicely broken up and it took the pedals great, it was just huge. So I did my research and I think that was when I pressed go on contacting Orange and saying I need this amp in my life. And that was nearly ten years ago and like i said I have never entertained the idea of getting anything else, as its just perfect, the best!

When i’m out on tour with Biffy, i’m using the OR100 because it is a split channel amp. It has a really pumping distortion channel and again the clean channel takes pedals really well. I use a lot of fuzz, big muffs, delays and stuff like that, it does it all, it’s a really good amp.

The primary thing about using the vertical 2X12, in an ideal world we would all want a wall of Orange amps behind us. But the places that I play in my band Vennart, they are all quite small anyway and its not needed to have an awful lot of volume on stage. Nevertheless, I tried this thing out, not only does it sound huge and it’s perfectly loud enough, it’s incredibly light so it’s actually quite a pleasure to load in and out of these absolute toilets that I play. I just love it, it sounds great!

I think it is recognisable the way that Orange has been since the late 60’s, early 70’s up until the present day. It hasn’t dabbled in anything other than what it is, it is a tool for guitar players. It’s not trying to be anything that it isn’t, so you don’t have any of these digital components and scrolling menus. When you play through one of these it’s an inspiring thing to actually put your heart into and it brings the best in your playing. I don’t really get that feeling with digital products myself.

I’m absolutely delighted to be an Orange ambassador because I don’t know, there is something inherently attractive about having one of these things onstage behind you. I love the logo, I’ve got an Orange tattoo, by the way! I’ve got this exact symbol on the back of my neck! They are just cool, I hate using that word cool. Somethings are cool,something aren’t cool and there is no tangible explanation for what makes something as cool as it is. This is the shit!

Some guitarists are purists. Like Orange, they refuse to ever “go digital.” We like those guitarists. They are our bread and butter. We share with them an affinity for analogue tone. Digital hardware, be damned.

Why won’t they make the switch? After all, digital promises fewer repair headaches and a plethora of tonal options. The reason they’re sticking with analogue is that it sounds better. There’s no way around it, folks. What vinyl is to MP3s, analogue amps are to digital modelers. Analogue offers a level of presence and warmth in one’s tone that just can’t be achieved with a digital signal.

We’ve compiled a short list of Orange Ambassadors that are all-analogue, all the time. Check out their own reasoning behind staying true to their tone:

Scott Holiday of Rival Sons
In this day and age we’ve all messed around with digital amps…and the technology is pretty good now! Almost like the real thing even! The only problem is..It’s NOT the real thing. And the real thing wins…every time. That’s why digital platforms are imitating it..Because nothing will ever beat the sound and feel of valves/tube amps/analog circuitry. There’s almost a living breathing quality to a great tube amp…an immediacy…an almost human quality in responsiveness. I’m not saying ‘reject technology’ or to not appreciate it…I do! And I implement said technology within my rig. What I’m saying is: nothing will ever beat the sound of a great tube/analog amplifier.”

Ken Rose of Hero Jr.
“I am one of those ‘freaks’ that can feel analog reacting with my body. In most cases I prefer analog because it feels like the amplifier and the effects and the tape, or whatever is analog, is directly connected to my expression and creativity. I am not dissing digital by any means, as I use it daily, but I personally feel an aural and auditory kinship with analog.”

Andreas Kisser of Sepultura
“Analogue sound is the truth, is what the digital world tries to emulate but never gets quite there. I only use the sound of the amp, straight to the guitar, no distortion pedals. That way I can feel the real sound of the guitar, the wood, the pick-up and the strings. Analogue is where the evolution of a musician is, you break your limits and create something new.”

Tim Sult of Clutch
“I prefer the warmth and depth of an analogue tone. It makes the wood of the guitar and cabinets sound more like a living being.”

Danko Jones
“Lately, I’ve seen bands playing live without real amps. I mean, wtf? If you’re a rock band and you’re not playing through real live amps during a show, it’s not a rock show.”

I’m Tom Petersson, bass player for the group Cheap Trick. I’m here in London, England at Sixty Sixty Sounds, Denmark Street.

I came with our guitar player Rick Nielsen, he and I came to London in 1968. We went to Cliff Cooper’s shop, Orange music which is around here somewhere! I don’t know where the exact location was and he was just starting to build Orange amps in the back room. 

Once the british invasion hit that kind of took over everybody’s lives at the time, it just kept going on and on, and people are still listening to it, its amazing!

We first saw Orange amps being used by Fleetwood Mac, they came over in ’69 in the US and they had the big giant bass rig. Peter Green and Danny Kirwan the tone they had was killer, I love to have the feel of the air being pushed like 412 cabinets. I’ve always liked the sound of tube amps, i’ve never liked transistors, it never had the right warmth to it and distortion. We’ve never used pedals for distortion, it’s all totally the amp being pushed to its maximum. I love the sound of the amp sounding like its about ready to blow up, like Jeff Beck is that perfect example of just great tone. Of course it’s in his hands, so it is different in that way but its just that sound and that warmth and that real distortion that you can’t get from transistor. You can’t match the sound of tube amps.

What I like about Orange is the quality of the gear and just the tone, it’s got that warm tube sound and you can push it. If you back off it will clear off a bit, it will be relatively clean and if you dig into it, it breaks up great. So you have got a lot of room with getting your own sound, with muting and it brings all the subtleties out in your playing. Something about the sound about the analogue amps is unbeatable.


Something about the sound about the analogue amps is unbeatable.

For us reliability is a big key and you don’t need amps breaking down. Having vintage amps is a pain, you can’t replace them, they get busted up traveling and the Orange gear just covers all the bases really.  You can get it anywhere and they just have great sound, they really are unbeatable.

I use an AD50 guitar head running a 412 orange cabinet and an AD200 bass head running a 412 orange cabinet and that is it!

I play a 12 string bass, my rig is really the same for a 4 string as a 12 string bass. Its that same guitar sound, your just really adding in the high, it’s a bit like a 12 string guitar playing along with a bass. When I switch over sometimes to a T-Bird or a Fender Precision, they both have that grand piano sound which is great. So you get that great guitar distortion and they have great low end. It’s really basically the same sound, the twelve string is a bit bigger because they’re are high strings going on. Get the great guitar sound and then just add bottom, nothing to it.

The main reason we keep going or most musicians, is that you don’t have a back up plan, it’s not like I can fall back on my lucrative dentistry career! I have been doing this since i was 14 years old and started playing in clubs since I was 15 and it’s really all we know. It’s what we love to do and I can’t imagine stopping. You are not thinking anything, you are playing for the love of it, there is mainly no money in it. You just do it because you love it, we have kept going and there is no reason to stop, yet!