Photo by: Pedro Hernandéz / @picfromthepit

Our followers and fans will already be familiar with you through your previous work in Deep Purple, Trapeze, California Breed (the list goes on and on…) and solo career, but they might not all know The Dead Daisies, can we get a bit of an introduction of the band?
Glenn: The Dead Daisies are a musical collective, a family if you will. I’ve been aware of the band for a long time, we had been on a similar circuit around Europe. I was contacted by their management in 2019 in regard to getting together with the guys in NYC to have a little “jam session”. We clicked right away. Of course, I had toured with Doug Aldrich (guitarist in The Dead Daisies) previously as he was a member of my touring band in 2016 – so that was already set it stone. David Lowy is a solid guitarist and Deen Castronovo is a fantastic drummer with lots of flare. It was a natural progression to write together and go into the studio to record.

You just released your single “Bustle and Flow”, what can you tell us about it?
Glenn:
We were recording at La Fabrique studios in the south of France, Dec 2019. The studio is an old Chateau set in a beautiful part of the countryside. We had recorded the music and I had most of the lyrics written. The setting of the studio was very inspiring, I could not fail to be influenced whilst living and working there. Find it here.

This year has been quite a bumpy road for most people, how have you adjusted to the ‘new normal’, and how do you stay creative and inspired during tough times?
Glenn:
I have tried to maintain my own daily routines and rituals as much as possible. I meditate when I wake up, I like to walk, drink lots of water and read a lot. So personally, I have been able to stay creative within my own inner sanctuary.

Of course, in an Orange interview we gotta do some gear talk! You’ve been using Orange for quite some time, what’s your history and experience with our amps?
Glenn:
I was using the AD200 heads live and, in the studio, but for the last 18 months I’ve been using the Terror Bass heads. They really sound amazing. I run 2 at the same time via the Orange ‘Amp Detonator’ pedal. I don’t use any distortion pedals, I use the gain structure of the amps, this allows me to get a far more natural crunch..

You’ve been in the game for a long time, and you’ve influenced a lot of people and musicians along the way. Was there anyone in specific who’s style of playing, way of writing or performing that inspired, of keeps inspiring you as an artist?
Glenn:
I think like many people of my generation, The Beatles were a big influence in my youth. Their song writing is still hard to beat all these years later. As for bass playing, my roots are very much set in the early Motown recordings, James Jameson really was the benchmark for groove playing. Of course, more local to home we had guys like Andy Fraser who was an incredibly soulful bassist, he knew when to leave a space or two. I also read a lot of books and one of my favourite authors at the moment is Eckhart Tolle. I always have 1 or 2 of his books with me when travelling.

What would your advice be to aspiring musicians who’s just getting into playing?
Glenn:
My advice would be to love what you’re doing, enjoy every moment and don’t take anything for granted. You need to dedicate your time to learning your craft and being the best, you can be. Walk through the fear.

In 2009, during “The Great Recession,” I found myself at a crossroads. I’d been at Orange for two years and was, for the first time, worried about my job. We were experiencing the worst downturn in the economy my generation had ever witnessed. Job safety was a huge concern. Orange had been absolutely crushing it until that point yet I found myself unsure about the future.

In response, I created Orange’s Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. It was my way of saying “I won’t go silently into the night.” In fact, I essentially created a new position for myself: Social Media Manager. More than a decade later and we have an entire team serving this role. I’m incredibly proud of what we have accomplished.

Enter 2020: the worst year ever. If this year was a fart it would be the kind that only happens on a blind date and you’re sitting on a white chair and it seeps through your pants and you can’t decide if you should get up and go to the bathroom because if you do you won’t be able to come back because the chair will be shit-stained and your date will post about it to their TikTok and no one will ever love you again.

2020 is garbage. So how do we make the best of it? Some of us have taken up a new hobby. Others have focused on making their big “pivot” to another line of work. But a small number of people, certainly the ones who are rife with self-absorption, have gone the way of livestreaming interviews. I count myself among this group.

Here’s a sampling of my favorite “Artist Relations Corner” interviews thus far. Yes, that’s the name I chose. It was a mistake but now the SEO has gone too far for me to change it. Now I get to live this shame forever. Enjoy, and for all of the Artist Relations Corners click here!

Episode #1: An introduction to who I am, what an AR Manager does, and commentary about the original “funny” Orange video, which featured Troy Sanders of Mastodon starring opposite a dog.

Episode #5: An interview with VMAN of Slipknot featuring his tech, Darren Sanders (yep, the brother of Troy from Mastodon and Kyle from HELL YEAH)

Episode #6: Thomas Jager of Monolord. There’s nothing better than talking stoner doom with a sarcastic Swede!

Episode #7: Rekti Yoewono of THE SIGIT and Mooner. This episode helped me discover a whole world of psychedelic rock from Indonesia that I never knew existed. Also, it features live jams!

Episode #9: Kellindo Parker is the guitarist for Janelle Monae and an accomplished solo artist. That’s not all though. He also has rad stories about Prince.

Episode #15: I interviewed legendary producer and engineer, the man who is considered “the 5th Ramone,” Mr. Eddie Stasium. His stories are incredible.

Episode #16: Brian Diaz is a mildly famous guitar tech…and one of my favorite people in the industry. He’s worked with Fall Out Boy, Primus, and Guns N Roses (to name a few). This episode is dear to me mainly because of how much we make each other laugh while being total buttholes to each other.

What are some of your earliest memories involving music?
Rekti:
My earliest memory would be listening to Michael Jackson’s ‘Thriller’, I would have been around 3 or 4 years old. I vividly remember the feeling I got when pressing the ‘play’ button on my mom’s tape deck, as I waited for the laughter on the intro of the song, before running to her cause I got scared. My mom also had this 70s British Rock compilation that had the Beatles, Rolling Stones, Yardbirds, Zeppelin, etc, and I also remember listening to that over and over.

My mother’s side of the family has always been into music, listening to records and exchanging mixtapes. Most of them played music at some point of their lives too. One of them, my late uncle, left school in the 60s to become a professional musician, and his band, The Rollies are considered legendary nowadays which is pretty cool. I also remember being at my grandma’s house in the 90s and listening to a local punk band, and my uncle saying if I liked that sorta music, I should check out The Stooges.

That’s so cool your entire family influenced you and your taste in music, and how it was such a natural part of your upbringing. Did they encourage your playing as well?
Rekti:
I think my grandma always had an acoustic guitar, but I didn’t notice or maybe just didn’t realise what kinda shapes and sounds it could produce, and what really triggered it for me was at the age of 11 or 12 when I saw Lenny Kravitz play ‘Are you gonna go my way’ on a flying V, with the sound reminding me of my mum’s Brit Rock compilation from when I was a kid. By this point, I was sold, and I wanted an electric guitar just like his one. I went to a guitar shop with my Dad not long after. They didn’t have any Flying V’s but did have this wonderful Gibson SG, which was of course very expensive. My conservative father told me to learn the basics first, and got me started out with a locally made acoustic guitar, which ended up shaping my way of playing as I learnt both Led Zeppelin and Bad Religion on that guitar. So I’m always kind of cautious with my right hand and developed a sense of dynamic in my picking. But sometimes I strum a little too hard, and often break strings because of that too.

When I was 17 I finally got my first electric guitar, I hustled and saved up money by selling t-shirts. By the time I’d saved up enough, the recession hit and the price sky rocketed and I could only afford an Epiphone Les Paul, which I later swapped for an Epiphany SG. In 2009 at 27, The Sigit started to make money from playing gigs, and I finally got a Gibson SG, Stull haven’t got that 60s Flying V though, haha.

As a polite heads up from the interviewer, yours truly Ella Stormark – if you don’t know The Sigit, or haven’t seen any of their live stuff – check out this video, it’s so awesome.

As a guitarist, is there anyone you would say has influenced you more than others?
Rekti:
Probably Jimmy Page because of his vast palette of sounds. It could be due to his guitar and what he managed to do with it, but stll, not many Les Paul players could reproduce what Page has done. The same goes for Eric Clapton, for that matter. I dunno man, maybe it’s just the way 50s/60s made gear sounded. I haven’t got the chance to find out first hand. But I always love that kind of sound.

You clearly have a love for for older music, what were the mutual influences you bonded over when forming The Sigit?
Rekti:
It started out with our mutual interest in Brit Pop, which was very much in style back then. We were all at the same high school, and sometimes we’d skip school to go to record stores or street vendors looking for new and exciting brit pop bands, and often end up finding older brit rock music like Roxy Music, T-Rex, Genesis, Black Sabbath etc. Then we’d hang out at our bass player’s house and try to learn those song using his dad’s gear, and perform them at a school festival once a year. He also had mixer and tape deck so occasionally we’d try to record some songs we made on the spot. We’d experiment with ping-pong tracking and overdubs, very crude and garagy. When we graduated, we started getting computers for collage assignements and started learning DAW, composing songs and making demos which we handed to friends or local magazines.

What’s your personal history and experience with Orange?
Rekti:
My first encounter with Orange was either through Oasis or Jimmy Page, maybe around junior high. No one around me nor any musician in my area had one though, so I was pretty curious about this mysteriously named and brightly coloured guitar amp.By the time we got to recording our debut album I’d hang around the studio and watch other bands record.

Some bands had their own amps, and was kind enough to let me try them to help decide what works for me and what doesn’t. Most of the ones I liked were vintage amps. However, although they sounded great, most of them were old and unstable and not cheap nor easy to repair, which made me hesitant to get myself any old equipment. That said, I was also impressed by an AD140 I tried, and how versatile it was, and the guy who owned it told me that he got it new from a shop in Jakarta. I went to the shop and they had a Rockerverb whose sound I loved, and it was as versatile as the AD140. The drive sounded great, and it was very responsive to my picking – and the colour! I was already sold when I saw Noel Gallagher’s Orange way back, it was very eye catching and you noticed it instantly. I thought it would be great to have this on stage too, so after successfully giving it a go I decided to go for Rockerverb 100.

What are the key things you look for in a guitar amp?
Rekti:
I like overdrive, to be able to control the amount of drive with my hand using knobs on the guitar or through my right hand picking, and how hard I strum the string. I also want to be able to tame the presence, I want it to slap my ear, not poke it. The bottom end also needs to be tight, and I want to feel the sound hitting from behind when the amps are placed at my back on stage. I’ve had my Rockerverb since 2009, and I still use that same amp to this day. I pair it with the angled PPC412 (PPC412AD), which is a perfect match to me.

What are you currently listening to?
Rekti:
I usually listen to records which limits me to what I have, but as for new stuffs the last video I saw on youtube was Idles – Grounds and Once & Future Band – Problem Addict.

Omer Haviv

Can we get a quick introduction of The Great Machine?
Omer:
Myself and Aviran are brothers, and Aviran and our drummer Michael met while working together at a pizza place. They started playing together, and after 2 months I joined them and The Great Machine was born. We’re based in Tel Aviv, the scene isn’t big but we do have our following here and we do love playing shows in Israel.

Did yourself and Aviran come from a musical home growing up?
Omer: We did, yeah. We grew up with our mum listening to Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Bob Dylan, Led Zeppelin, Van Morrison, The Doors and more.They were all part of our early influences, as well as Nirvana, Offspring, Metallica and Body Count.

You guys put on some pretty crazy shows! How would you describe a Great Machine gig?
Mind blowing
Ground shaking
Going all the way
Love spreading
Heart opening
No borders
A Trip

What’s been the highlights of the band so far?
Omer:
Opening for Ozzy Osbourne in Israel, playing Desertfest London & Berlin and Rock Palast in Germany and touring with All Them Witches.

Aviran Haviv

What’s your history and experience with Orange Amps?
Omer: I first heard of Orange when I was young, but it was too expensive for me. I’ve since played Orange on tour, and more recently in the studio where I used a Thunderverb 50 and of of the Crush amps. When we play live I play a JCM800 full stack and Thunderverb 50 half stack, the dream is 3 full stacks on stage

What do you look for in an amp?
Omer: It has to be strong with a lot of output, simple / vol / treble / mid / bass / gain. Not too dark, not to bright, and reliable for touring.

You have been an Orange player for a long time now, can you tell us a bit about your history and experience with the company?

オレンジのプレーヤーになって長いのですが、わが社との出会いと経歴を簡単に教えて貰えますか?
Wata: Boris has been active since 1992.We have been touring through USA, Europe, Asia, Oceania and various places. When we first started, we were influenced by the 1960-70 psychedelic and hard rock music. Often, we watched the artists we adored; many were using Orange gear. I was struck with the cute looks and the fat, warm sound. When I got to be interested in Orange amps, the original vintages were already expensive(as they are now). When OR120 was reissued in the early 1990s in Japan, I was able to purchase a half stack. I have been obsessed with Orange sound ever since. I keep collecting various vintage heads, cabinets, and current lineups

Borisは1992年から活動しています。日本だけでなく、アメリカ、ヨーロッパ、アジア、オセアニアなど、様々な国をまわっています。結成当初は1960~1970年代サイケやヘヴィロックを良く聴いていました。そのあこがれのミュージシャンの映像を観るとOrangeを使っている人がいっぱいいて、見た目のかわいさと、太く暖かいサウンドに惹かれました。私がOrange Ampに興味を持った当時、既にオリジナルのヴィンテージはとても高価(今はもっとですね)でしたが、1990年代半ばにちょうど日本国内でもOR120のリイシューが発売になり、ハーフスタックを購入しました。そこからOrangeサウンドの虜になって、以後ヴィンテージのヘッドやキャビネット、現行品までを色々手に入れています。

You’ve been playing both the OR120 and the Rockerverb 100 paired with the PPC412 – what do you look for in an amp, and what do you like about these two?

OR120とRockerverb 100PPC412に繋いで使用していますがアンプに求めていることは何でしょうか?又、この2つのどこが気に入っていますか?
Wata:
Very rich mids and lows, powerfulness, simple operation, cool looks of a full stack. It is easy for me  to create non-distortion sound with OR120 or Rockerverb 100. Also these amps work well with my Les Paul and the fuss pedal that use. We have just released a new album “NO” on July 3. The world has unexpectedly changed to the extreme. We recorded this album wishing that it will comfort all the listeners. There are many fast―tempo tracks. Orange cabinets played a very important role in the recording studio. The Orange cabs were able to maintain the core tonality with different amp heads

中低域の豊かさ、パワー感、シンプルな操作性。フルスタックでの見た目の格好良さ。OR120やRockerverb 100は歪まない音作りがしやすいのと、私が使っているレスポールやFUZZペダルとも相性が良いです。ちょうど7/3に”NO”という新しいアルバムをリリースしたところです。こんな世界の状況になってしまって、エクストリームだけど、聴く人を癒すような作品になってくれたら良いなと思いながら作りました。テンポの速い曲が多いですが、レコーディングではOrangeキャビネットがとても重要になりました。色々なヘッドを使っても音の芯をしっかり残してくれます。

How would you describe the Boris writing and creating process?

Borisの作曲・創作のプロセスをどう説明しますか?
Wata:
Basically, a song starts when we get inspired from jamming around and improvising. We record simultaneously when we are having jam sessions. The pieces are then put together and edited to become a song. The instruments, pedals, Orange amps and cabinets all play significant roles. The expression of the song gets the member more excited and lead us to the direction it ought to be. We also strive to input our experience from the touring,  the faces from audience that we saw from the stage, and the feeling we had then.

基本的にはJamやインプロビゼーションを出発点にして作曲は始まります。いつもスタジオではジャムセッションと同時進行でレコーディングが行なわれ、それらが編集され曲になっていきます。楽器、ペダル、もちろんOrangeのアンプやキャビネットも楽曲を生み出すのに重要です。音の表情に導かれてメンバーの気持ちも高揚しますし、楽曲の向かうべき先を定められます。また、ツアーに出て吸収したこと、ステージから見えるオーディエンスの顔、フィーリングが作曲のインプットになって曲作りに繋がっています。

How have you as a band been dealing with the lack of live music in recent times, and what do you think about bands going digital in terms of live streams etc?

ライブが出来ない現状をどのように対応していますか?又、ライブストリームのようなデジタル志向をバンドとして考えていますか?
Wata:
Being able to touch the bodies of audience with huge sound is extremely important to our shows. You cannot feel the music with your body through live streams. We may consider releasing a video product after editing the live footages from the past. But I am skeptical about live streaming. From the stage we cannot make eye contacts with the audience. I can understand that the current (pandemic) situation is forcing many artists to go online and take more actions. But we are worried it will possibly end up destroying valuable culture of live music. So we are looking at it very carefully.

私たちのショウでは大音量でオーディエンスの身体に触れることがとても大事な要素です。 体全体で感じてもらうこと。ライブストリームではそれが不可能です。過去のライブ映像を編集して「映像作品」として公開することは前向きになれますが、ライブストリーミングに関しては懐疑的です。ステージからオーディエンスと目が合わない事にも問題があります。こういった状況だからアクションを起こさなければならないのも理解していますが、その行動が大切な文化を破壊することにもなりかねません。とても慎重に考えています。

Wata’s gear:
Rockerverb 100 MK III
PPC412

Welcome to the Orange family, ladies! You’ve been around the Manchester scene for a while now, can we get a bit of background on the band for those new to you?
WITCH FEVER:
We’re Witch Fever, a doom punk band from Manchester. We met during uni and have been a band for four years, with a line up change after the first year, and it’s been the four of us, Amy on vocals, Alisha on guitar, Alex on bass and Annabelle on drums ever since. When we started we knew we wanted to be heavy, and wanted to create music that empowered us and other people. We all have a very varied music taste which comes together to make the Witch Fever sound. Here’s some of the stuff we’re currently listening to:

Amy – Show Me The Body, Amyl and the Sniffers, Surfbort, Angel Olsen, Ho99o9
Alex – Boy Harsher, Slowdive, Protomartyr, Savages
Alisha – Nirvana, Grimes, PJ Harvey, Warpaint, Hole
Annabelle – Velvet Underground, Violent Femmes, The Plastic People of the Universe, Moses Boyd, Peaches, Sonic Youth 

One of our musical highlights so far was headlining House of Vans in London for Venn Records, particularly because V Man, the bassist for Slipknot, was there! We also played Manchester International Festival on a stage in front of the town hall which felt very special. Last year Alan Mcgee of Creation Records produced our singles Bezerk(h)er and The Hallow which was brilliant and something we’ll never forget.

Obviously the whole music industry’s come to a bit of a stand still lately with gigs, touring and practicing together off the table, how have you been keeping creative and connected?
WITCH FEVER:
We’ve been recording demos to send over to Gomez (Orgone Studios) who we’re going into the studio with in July to record an EP, so we’ve mostly been focusing on writing new music. Outside of music we’ve been reading a lot, making art, cooking and Alex has played lots of Animal Crossing.

Exciting times with new music ahead, and that’s awesome you’re recording with Gomez! How did that all come about?
WITCH FEVER:
We were connected with Gomez through a label we’re working with at the moment (yet to be announced…) so we’re very excited for whats to come! We’re recording an EP for now, but there’s talks about an album afterwards.

Of course, we gotta ask some Orange! What’s your history and experience with our amps?
Amy:
My first memory of Orange comes from when I was a child, my Dad’s been in bands since I was young and plays bass through an Orange amp to this day. It always stuck in my head because of the colour, being the brightest thing in my parents bedroom. As a teenager I also developed a love for Cancer Bats and Slipknot, so there’s that association too!

Michele! Lovely to chat to you, and even more so to welcome you to the Orange family. Can we get a bit of an introduction for our readers?
Michele:
I was born in Trinidad – Port of Spain. We were very close as a family, living together with our uncles, aunts, cousins and grandparents. We later we moved to New York and lived in an apartment in Queens, Astoria for six years. After changing schools numerous times as a kid growing up and our parents working a number of jobs to survive, my dad left to make a life for us in London where we have been settled ever since. This was also the birthplace of our band ‘The Magic Numbers’. Music was always a big part of our upbringing, country music was very popular in Trinidad and our family would listen to old Patsy Cline, Hank Williams, J.Cash, Guy Clark records, and my brother Romeo (The Magic Numbers’ singer) and I were struck by the power these songs had over our family. Many a night was spent listening, singing and crying along to those songs.

Are there any bands or artists that stick out to you as an early influence?
Michele: As a songwriter I’m influenced by a lot of singer-songwriters Joni Mitchell, Emmylou Harris, Neil Young, John Prine, Ferron, Conor Oberst, etc… I also love bands like Fleetwood Mac, Radiohead and Beach Boys. As a bass player and musician I’m obsessed with the groove and melody, it has to move and it has to sing! I’m inspired by the lines of Carol Kaye, Colin Greenwood, and all those James Jamerson Motown and Ron Carter Jazz records, as well as a lot of AfroBeat jamming to Tony Allen, Fela Kuti grooves and Reggae too… I listen to and inspired by a lot of music, learning is favourite thing about being a musician. 

Can you tell us a bit about The Magic Numbers?
Michele: The band was formed after moving to London and meeting the Gannons, Sean (drummer) & Angela (singer/keyboardist). Romeo & Sean started a band called ‘Guess’ and together with other musicians and singers worked the London circuit playing gigs, sending out demos and rehearsing in our mum and dad’s front room, which was turned into a studio with egg boxes and mattresses on the walls, all covered with ply board. Eventually the asked Angela and myself to join the band, and we started writing different songs and that’s when we became The Magic Numbers. We built up a core following before the days of the internet by playing so much, people started talking about us. Before we knew it, word of mouth had led us to selling out The Forum with only a 7inch single being released.

We’ve been fortunate to tour and share the stage with so many bands we admire. We supported Brain Wilson and got to sing ‘Love & Mercy’ with him on stage. Toured around the States with Flaming Lips & Sonic Youth, Bright Eyes, Rufus Wainwright, U2, The Who and many more. One of our ‘dream come true moments’ was getting to open up for Neil Young & Crazy Horse around Germany, watching them at the side of the stage every night hanging out and shaking hands with Uncle Neil. Ha! I’d say we were pinching ourselves a few times. We released ‘Outsiders’ our fifth studio album in 2018 and continue to tour that record… This year is our 15th year anniversary of our debut record, and there’s always plans for making new music together. Romeo is doing a lot of production work and collaborations writing for and with artists too.  

You’ve also released a couple of solo albums, the latest one being in 2016 – are you working on anything new for yourself?
Michele: I am indeed! I’m currently at the end stages of recording my third solo album set for release either at the end of this year 2020 or the beginning of next… It’s a record I’m really proud of and can’t wait to share with everyone. I write all the time and have a few other solo records under my belt. It’s just grabbing the moments to get into the studio to record them all. I also do many collaborations with artists and co-write too. You can find my bass playing on a few records out there Rowan Rheingans ‘The Lines we Draw Together’ / David Kitt ‘Yous’ / guitars, bass and vocals for O’Hooley & Tidow ‘Shadows’ & a recent co-write and musical collaboration with Charlie Dore on new album ‘Like Animals’ set for release this year. In 2019 I got the opportunity to perform in the Danny Boyle, Richard Curtis movie ‘Yesterday’ and play bass and sing on the Abbey Road Studio recorded soundtrack – reinterpreting those classic Beatles’ songs. 

Wow, that’s so awesome! I’d love to hear more about how the ‘Yesterday’ opportunity came about?
Michele: I was asked by an amazing producer/musician friend of mine, Adem. He was helping to MD the project and put together ‘Jack’s (Himesh Patel’s) band. Composer Daniel Pemberton, director Danny Boyle and writer Richard Curtis (all these insanely talented people I admire and am inspired by) were looking for something special/badass on stage for the movie. It was all a bit a dream… Not only that I couldn’t imagine up something like this in a million years, but it seemed to happened so quickly and intensely I couldn’t quite believe it. I was on tour with my band The Magic Numbers, and then off to shoot these iconic movie scenes. One of them at midnight, playing bass on stage at Wembley ‘fucking’ Stadium!! Before shooting begun we spent some pretty amazing days recording the soundtrack at Abbey Road Studios where I got to play different versions of all those McCartney/ Lennon ‘Beatles’ classics. So yeah… a total once in a lifetime moment, I sometimes lie in bed thinking did this really happen. I also requested an Orange backline for the movie when I played.

That must have been pretty surreal, what an opportunity! So cool you used Orange as well, which leads me to my next question! What is your history and experience with Orange?
Michele: It’s been a long time since my love affair with Orange began, I remember rocking out onstage – think it was in America, maybe even SXSW in Austin. There was an Orange backline for the gig, I plugged in and never looked back… It looks so fucking cool too. My amp is a cherry red version AD200 MKIII head with an OBC410 & OBC115 cabs. As far as experiences go, I’ve only had great experiences with Orange and the team of people. They all love what they do and they do it with care and genuinely get it, from the musicians side of things. I’ve been using Orange almost since the beginning of the band now. Whenever we’re on tour and I’m unable to bring my own gear I always request Orange.

What do you look for in an amp?
Michele: Particularly in a bass amp, I’m looking for clarity, punch, depth and warmth. I have to feel the vibrations through my body and still be able to make out the melody lines I’m playing, it’s really integral to our band’s sound and the hook lines in our songs. Some amps lack the depth and warmth, it’s either too harsh and has a short attack… I hate that. I move around a lot on stage with the band and I want to be able to feel the sound is moving, grooving with me. Orange amps are the only amp for me. 

What would be your advice to people aspiring to play?
Michele: Take your time, don’t force it… Work out what you like and when you do. Fall in love with your instrument, form an unhealthy relationship and become obsessed with it. Wake up next to it, fall asleep playing it, tell your friends you can’t go out and instead enjoy the calluses forming on your fingertips. I remember playing my bass over and over at all hours of the night learning to sing and play at the same time… I wanted to be able to do both things because I love singing too. I wanted to do them both at the same level of badass!! I was addicted… You’ve gotta love it, enjoy, get frustrated, push yourself and take the time to lose yourself with it. Music and your instrument will always be there for you… Once everyone’s asleep it’s waiting to be played and written on. It’s the perfect little secret.

Heavy Temple at Psycho Las Vegas by Dante Torrieri

Nighthawk: My history with music goes as far back as I can remember. My parents had a pretty diverse record collection and they encouraged me to play early on. I started on piano and eventually moved to cello as a classically trained musician, though admittedly I hated practicing. I was a music major for a year and then realized I just wasn’t cut out for it. I dropped out, bought my first bass and discovered that playing it came much more naturally to me. I was at my friend’s house getting stoned and he put on Black Sabbath’s first album (for those who are wondering, yes, I didn’t hear that record until I was 20). That’s when I knew what I wanted to do. I also make flyers for our shows, and had made a bunch for our tour that just got postponed. I just really enjoy doing anything creative when it comes to music, be it writing, playing, making flyers, just experiencing it in any way possible. You can check out my flyers here.

What can you tell us about your band Heavy Temple?
Nighthawk:
I found myself without a band in 2012 and was rather depressed. I went through the “I’m gonna sell all my gear and quit music forever” phase. Then one day I just sat in the basement and started recording a few riffs that had been kicking around in my head. Fast forward to 2 records, 6 lineups and 8 years later. I feel like we’re really starting to hit our stride as far as live performance and collective writing. We all have different desert island records but also have a strong foundation in heavy rock. Our personal influences span everything from punk and black metal to psych and doom. The Sabbathian overtures on the first two records are obvious but not directly intentional. With this third record, you’ll hear more vibes like Black Angels, Queens of the Stone Age, Acid King, if I had to put a finger on it.  We were set to release that this year on a label, but since the world is ending we might just put it out ourselves.

Is there any artists that stands out as an influence to you?
Nighthawk:
I always find myself struggling to answer this question succinctly. If I’m naming bass heroes, I’d say Nick Oliveri (as bassist for Queens of the Stone Age), Bootsy Collins, and Lemmy. The bass playing I enjoy the most is groove based and more complex than you think, like Captain Beyond, early Scorpions, Grand Funk. Overall I’m influenced by a lot of things. Basically whatever sounds good to me. Could be High on Fire, could be Interpol. Could be Tchaikovsky. 

You recently got the OB1-500, how are you getting on with it? Have the neighbours complained yet?Nighthawk: Oh. My. God. I can’t believe I haven’t played through this before. The tone that I’m able to get straight out of the head is insane. Honestly it’s a real game changer for me. The fact that it splits the signal so you can dial in the clean sound before sprinkling that distortion on top is great. And if we’re being honest I like the easy to discern images on the face plate for people like me who sometimes have one too many shots of tequila before playing. As for our neighbors, they’re actually pretty cool. One keeps asking when we’re putting out a new record, so we got that going for us.

You also just released a solo album, what can you tell us about it and the influences behind it? 
Nighthawk:
Well, I love Italian horror movies and film scores. I also really enjoy the process of composing, so the album I just released, “The Dimensionaut” (listen here), is really an homage to all of that. It’s nearly a decade of music that I’ve wanted to put out for the longest time, so I figured I’d just go for it. I dig what you can accomplish with synths. There’s so much atmosphere you can achieve. My favorite tracks have a sort of ethereal synth sound with a massively wet reverb guitar track over top. We’re also releasing a split Funkadelic EP on Riff Merchant Records with our friends from Wolf People in a couple of days on the 31st of May which we’re excited about.

The Saturday of Black Deer Festival was blisteringly hot and the days music was exceptional. In the afternoon Orange got the pleasure to sit down with William Crighton to talk through his musical influences growing up in Australia and how he is inspired to write songs both collectively and solo. He even strapped on his trusty resonator and played through the new TremLord 30 with its all analogue signal and valve tremolo and reverb.

How did you get into music?
I started in church, my grandmother used to take me and my brother to church in a little place called Ardlethan, a town of about 300 hundred people. It’s where we used to start singing the church hymns, i’m not really Christian any more but you can’t deny that sort of connection with that music. ‘How great thou art’ and ‘Amazing grace’, they are beautiful songs, I was a young kid you get swept up in emotion of the songs of that for sure.

Who are your biggest guitar influences?
My favourite guitar player is Neil Young just because he is so visceral, he plays what he feels and it’s cool. He would probably be my biggest influence across the board.

What inspires your song writing?
It’s always a tough question to describe your music, I’m not really a wonderful musician by a stretch. So I just do what I do and try and be honest with what I do, how I play and what I sing about and how I present it to everybody. My biggest inspiration is the world around us, just try to take it in, everything I have listened to as a kid probably flows into the music, you can’t stop that.

Do you usually write songs as a band or by yourself?
Bit of both, I wrote a lot of the songs by myself, a lot of the songs I write with my wife Jules and my brother Luke, or the rest of the band. It’s interesting touring solo, it’s a whole new thing I just did a tour in Australia and I found the same thing. You are out there by yourself so you have got no one supporting you but your also free to do whatever you like, I quite enjoy it, there is definitely room for both.

How are you finding the festival so far?
I just saw the Sheepdogs they were awesome and John Butler Trio who were great, fellow Australians, Irish Mythen, John Smith. Just walking around and hearing the buzz of everyone around is cool. It seems like a festival where everyone seems at home, everyone talks to one another, you walking past and the security guard says hello is always a good thing. I’m enjoying myself.

Adam: I’m Adam Kenny, mandolin, bouzouki and banjo player for the Rumjacks. We play fast Celtic punk rock. I grew up in western Sydney with Irish parents, where I was exposed to a lot of Irish music like the Pogues, The Cheiftans, The furyeys, Christy Moore and more at our family barbecues. At the time I laughed at them thinking I was too cool, and it wasn’t until years later when I was listening to Joe Strummer playing with The Pogues, I found heard a beautiful mix of punk and folk, something that inspires us as a band to this day.

Music was clearly a part of your childhood being played at the house, when did you get into playing yourself?
Adam: My Dad gave me a Stratocaster copy when I was 13 or 14, He taught me ‘House of the rising sun’, and I was hooked. I did a year of classical guitar before I discovered Nirvana which became all I wanted to play for years. I played in a few different punk and hardcore bands and joined The Rumjacks as guitarist in 2008. After a few line up changes I ended up teaching myself mandolin, which in turn led me to tenor banjo and Irish bouzouki. Since then, I’ve had the pleasure of touring and recording with other folk/rock acts like Handsome Young Strangers, The Go Set, The Clan, and Irish singer/songwriter, Damien Dempsey.

Can you tell us a bit about The Rumjacks?
Adam: We’re a celtic punk band formed in 2008, in the Blue Mountains, Sydney, Australia. We were all involved in different projects at the time, but as we found such a great sound together we started playing shows in Sydney, followed by the rest of Australia. In 2015 we did our first of many European tours, and in 2017 we did our first USA tour, before hitting south east Asia and Japan in 2019. When we tour, early starts and long hours in the van is normal for us, we keep it simple with a very small crew, so we are still involved in the fun load-ins and outs.

What are you up to during these strange locked down days?
Adam: I’ve been writing a bit, taking care of the garden and hanging out with the family cat. I’m lucky enough to be stuck in my hometown in the blue mountains right now, I just hope I can leave again for the upcoming summer festivals in Europe!

What’s your history and experience with Orange?
Adam:
I first started noticing Orange at live shows around the 2000s when I was watching a lot of punk and hardcore bands in Sydney, the sound they gave really blew me away, especially when driven for the harder styles. Naturally, the bright colours and cool symbols for the controls stood out to me. I was so used to seeing just big black Marshall and Peavey stacks, Orange always intrigued me. Over the years, I saw more and more of them popping up onstage (and in studios), and I thought these amps must be the real deal. After shifting to acoustic instruments live and in the studio, I was always on the lookout for good acoustic amps an DI preamps, it’s always a battle playing acoustic instruments live with with full volume band, so the notch / feedback controls were a must for dealing with different live stages. I also hated having a pile of single DI boxes in front of me, so the dual channels on the Orange Acoustic Pre really stood out to me.

I use passive flat piezo style pickups in some of my instruments, and I can still get a steady and ballsy signal to the sound desk. Outperforms itself every night, a great piece of kit! I’m currently running an Orange Acoustic Pre for mandolin, Irish bouzouki, Tenor banjo and acoustic guitar, and the Crush Acoustic 30 for onstage foldback and in the studio. K&K banjo twin pick ups in the banjo and Irish bouzouki, Crafter mandolin with CnR-4 pickup. Godin acoustic guitar with Lr-baggs M80 pickup.