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Since 2016 Orange Amplifiers has had an artist relations office in Nashville, TN. Nashville is known for much more than Country music these days. As the result of a migration from LA, NY and points all over the US (and beyond) by artists like Jack White, Black Keys, and many others, a very thriving local Indie scene has exploded here. Consequently, we see artists of every stripe here in the Nashville Showroom.

In a given month we may have visits from the guys from Catfish and the Bottle Men, Mothership, Tyler Bryant and the Shakedown, Lilly Winwood, Velvet Starlings, Skeleton Krew, Marcus King or Smashing Pumpkins.

Having said all this, we do get our share of straight Country Music artists as well. It’s just sometimes tough to draw the distinction between who is Country, Rock or Americana these days. How does one define a brilliant guitarist like longtime Orange Ambassador Marcus King or Zakk Brown?

Marcus King with Orange’s Nashville Artist Rep, Pat Foley

Just recently we had a major video shoot take place in the showroom and in the parking lot just outside. It was a full-on roundup of bikers, hot rods, beer, barbeque and loud music. Billy F Gibbons and Orange Ambassador Tim Montana teamed up on the video for their project called the Whisker Brothers. The theme was a celebration of summer days and nights and particularly the joys of a major barbeque cookout and party. Rather unusual and very country.

BBQ and Cars…yeah, that seems about right for a Tim Montana/ZZ Top video shoot

Our regular visitors run the gamut from country session players like Pat Buchanan and Buddy Woodward looking to borrow something special for a session, rockin country bands like The Cadillac 3 or members of Luke Combs Band, full on Rock bands like The Gene Simmonds Band or mega guitarist Orianthi as well as Country singers like Margot Price or Raelyn Nelson. We also regularly provide amps or pedals to some legendary Nashville studios like RCA Studio B, Omni Sound or Ocean Way. Just this week we provided two AD30 amps and  multiple cabs to new Orange Ambassador Adam Lester for the Peter Frampton Tour which should be amazing judging by the rehearsals.

One of the artists we are featuring for Voice of Country Month is a great new Country artist from Rochester, NY named Claudia Hoyser. Claudia and her producer, Tony Gross paid us a visit a while back while in town for the Country Radio Seminar. Claudia loved the Rocker 15 and Tony was enthralled with the Acoustic pre-amp which he has integrated into both their recording and performance rigs.

New Orange Ambassador Claudia Hoyser

We get it all here in Nashville. If you happen to be on the road and passing through Nashville feel free to give us a call and perhaps drop in for a visit.

Orange Amps Nashville: 1310 Clinton Street, Suite 105, Nashville, Tennessee, 37203

The first time I saw an Orange amp was a picture of Jimmy Page. And the first time I played on was in Nashville when I tried a Rockerverb. I’ve been playing one ever since.

The thing that attracted me to playing an Orange amp was that I’m always looking for a great clean tone. I rely on a certain pedal for my drive. When I plugged it into a Rockerverb MKIII I realized I could sustain it forever. I also love the attenuator.

I drive the volume pretty hard and I use the attenuator to control my actual level. I have an Overdrive called the TB Drive made by a friend in Germany and that’s my drive tone, always. It’s two channels of Overdrive so I’m always on the clean channel of the Rockerverb and controlling the filth with the volume knob on my guitar. I like to use the volume control on my guitar instead of switching channels on amps.

The thing that I like about an Orange amp for a clean sound is that it has some body in the sound. A lot of times, if you’re just trying to get a clean sound out of an amp, you’re turning it down so the tubes aren’t breaking up. But with the clean on the Rockerverb you can still get the tubes doing what they need to do but you still have a full-bodied sound without a thin tone. That’s crucial to me.

Click here to check out more Tyler Bryant and the Shakedown

For many of you Orange might be known as a stoner rock company, which, fair enough, is an easy assumption to make as we have quite a fair bit of heavy bands on our roster, and regularly share that picture, you know, THAT picture of Matt Pike with the stacks of amps across our Instagram. However, Orange is for everyone, and for example, in Japan, we’re known as a clean sounding company, now would ya believe it?! In the name of Orange and it’s diversity, let’s take a look at a few of our artists who are proudly sporting some clean Orange sound.

Tyler Bryant, Tyler Bryant and the Shakedown

Rockerverb MKIII

Guitarist Tyler Bryant of Tyler Bryant and the Shakedown fell for the blues at an early age, and moved to Nashville at the age of 17 to make music. He has since proven himself as an incredible musician, and have toured or played with bands and artists such as Jeff Beck, Aerosmith, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Joe Bonamassa and Guns ’N’ Roses. He’s released two albums and EPs with his band, and continues to tour and make music.

Graveyard, Truls Mörck

AD200
Sweden’s Gothenburg has almost become a mecca for this whole 70s revival thing with bands such as Graveyard, Horisont and Witchcraft making names for themselves far away from their Nordic borders. Truls was originally the guitarist of the band, but left after their first record to focus on different things. However, low and behold, a few years back the band saw yet another change of lineup and was this time in the need of a bassist. Truls joined the band again, and have now been playing with them for the past two records “Innocence & Decacence” and 2018´s “Peace”. Truls wasn’t too familiar with Orange when rejoining the band, but as former bassist Rikard was an avid Orange user it seemed natural to give it a go. Having tried a few different amps such as Ampeg and Fender, he eventually decided on Orange as it seemed like the best fit for the kinda music they were playing. “They’re pretty straightforward without too many buttons, so it’s quite easy to get good sound.

Grateful Dead, Bob Weir

Rocker 15
Bob Weir, founding member of ICONIC hippie psychedelic peace and love loving pioneers the Grateful Dead and the original acid granddad. It all started on new year’s eve in 1963 when a sixteen year old Bob heard banjo music played from Dana Morgan’s Music Store while he was wandering the streets of Palo Alto looking for a club that would let him and his other underage friend in. Intrigued by the music they were hearing, they were lured in to the store where a young Jerry Garcia was sat playing. Bob and Jerry ended up spending the night playing music together, and decided to form a band, which later saw them at the front of a hippie revolution. In 1994 he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame due to his time in Grateful Dead. He’s also played in various other bands such as Kingfish, Bobby and the Midnites, and RatDog, all while maintaining a solo career.

Bad Religion, Jay Bentley

4 Stroke

Jay Bentley is the bassist and one of the founding members of political Californian punk rock band Bad Religion, and have with the exception of a little break from ’83 to ’85 played with the bands since the formation in 1980. The band is known for their philosophical, social and politic lyrics and their vocal harmonies, and are considered to be one of the best-selling punk rock bands of all times, with more than five million albums sold worldwide. When not playing with Bad Religion, Jay has also been touring regularly with punk supergroup and cover band Me First and the Gimmie Gimmies, filling in for bass for Fat Mike.

Temples, Tom Warmsley

Tom Warmsley of Temples

OBC410

Formed in Northamptonshire in 2012 Temples kind of just exploded into the UK music scene with their neo psychedelic and modern take on classic British pop rock. After the release of their debut album “Sun Structures” in 2014 you couldn’t leave the house without hearing the single “Shelter Song” played relentlessly on every corner, and the album charted at number seven in the UK. Bassist Tom Warmsley is an Orange ambassador, and has this to say about our amps: “Orange amplification is as strikingly integral, alien, gorgeous and mysterious as it was in 1968, a true transition period of British amplificiation. In every instance of footage, the amps look as psychedelic as the bands playing through them.”

Yo, its Tyler from Tyler Bryant and the Shakedown and I play Orange Amps.

So I heard the music of Elvis Presley when i was in first grade and that was that pivotal moment where I became obsessed with music. When I was eleven I went into a guitar shop and I heard this guy called Roosevelt Twitty playing and he asked me if I liked the blues and I said “what’s the blues?”. He said; “it’s what I’m playing” and I said; “well then I love the blues!” I ran into him again and again, long story short, I put a dirtbike that I had on layaway and got an electric guitar and it’s been downhill ever since!

Blues lead me to guys like Johnny Winter and Jimi Hendrix, which lead me to the Black Crowes and Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers. So the blues led me to Rock n Roll which inspired me to get out of high school when I was seventeen and move to Nashville. There I started focusing on songwriting and forming a band, and I ended up with a band called the Shakedown. That’s kind of how it all played out.

I was actually riding around Nashville, with Graham Whitford who is also in the Shakedown and he said i’m going to stop into the Orange amps office and try some amps. So I said I will go with you and plugged into a Rockerverb. I wanted something I could get a lot of sustain out of and I tried the Rockerverb and got one, I loved it so much. I just use one channel on the Rockerverb, the clean channel and I drive it hard and I use the attenuator to set the volume and its as simple as that. I just love how much sustain I can get out of that amp. I just happened to rolling around with Graham in Nashville and played one and here we are.

So I always want an amp that has a good clean channel but also sounds big, if I don’t have a pedal on. But I don’t want an amp that is so distorted that I can’t have some control at my pedal board. So it’s this fine balance of an amp that’s big and full and that’s almost on the edge of being crunchy but still clean and precise. I like to hear, it’s hard to explain, I want the amp to sound glassy, like I want to hear the tubes and feel that play between the guitar and the amp.

 

 

The Dual Dark, as Lead Designer Ade Emsley describes it, is an Orange amp “for guitarists who don’t usually play Orange amps.” The Dual Dark is a completely different beast, both in terms of gain and voicing, from every other amp Orange has ever produced. It’s tighter on the bottom-end and has an almost percussive nature to its attack. And while all Orange amps tend to have massive amounts of distortion, it’s the searing brutality of the dirty channel (Channel B) on the Dual Dark really sets it apart from amps like the Rockerverb MKIII.

There are a lot of similarities between the Dual Dark and our now discontinued Thunderverb series. The Thunderverb 50 and 100 were the first Orange amps to feature attenuators and shape knobs. The attenuator is great for the studio and bedroom practice, since it allows the volume to be decreased without affecting the tone. The shape knob is actually a mid-scoop that takes the player from classic rock all the way through to mind-melting metal. These features, when introduced originally, were received well by Orange enthusiasts so it only made sense to keep them on future models (the Rockerverb MKIII also has an attenuator).

The similarities end when it comes to the voicing of the amps. If the Thunderverb was a true modern Orange amp, and the Rockerverb MKIII a melding of classic and modern tones, then the Dual Dark is the amp that bridges them all together. Channel A on the Dual Dark is extremely versatility, boasting a wide range of tones from Brit-rock to R&B. On this channel it can even be made to sound similar to our flagship AD30 head. But switch over to Channel B, the assumed “dirty channel” for most players, and let the shape knob rocket you into Thunderverb 200 high-gain metal territory (this, for example, is the channel Matt Pike from Sleep prefers).

It’s the Dual Dark’s voicing is what allows for such versatility. By backing off on the “fuzziness” that is inherent in most Orange amps (a desirable trait to most of our fans), Lead Designer Ade Emsley has made the Dual Dark capable of mimicking a wider variety of amp voicings. If other amp companies make “fizzy” sounding amps, and Orange is normally known for “fuzz,” then the Dual Dark occupies that in-between “fizz-fuzz” that makes it so unique.

There’s something for everybody in the Dual Dark series. Here are some examples of Orange Ambassadors from a wide variety of genres that have made the Dual Dark their go-to amps.

Matt Pike – Sleep, High on Fire

The Dual Dark 100 is always the first amp Matt requests on his backline riders. He prefers it above all other current production Orange amps. For him, it’s the gain and the gain alone that he desires. If we could supply him with 50 Dual Dark 100’s per show he’d take it.

Al Cisneros – Sleep

After Matt Pike started using the Dual Dark 100 regularly, Al got in touch and said he was interested in giving it a shot. Al uses a huge stack of bass amps, yes, but he also runs his signal through a guitar half stack to achieve a more grindy, trebly top-end to his tone. The Dual Dark 50 has become his go-to guitar amp since 2017.

Graham WhitfordTyler Bryant and the Shakedown

“It’s one of those amps you can plug straight into without a single pedal and get everything you need. I love it.”

Dave Catching – Eagles of Death Metal

We’ve had EODM’s lead guitarist, the absolutely most awesome dude on earth, Dave Catching, playing the Dual Darks on stage for several years. Coming from a Marshall/Fender background, he like a lot of our Dual Dark Ambassadors was turned on by the fact it doesn’t sound “classically Orange.” Dave also found that the Dual Dark can works wonders in his studio, Rancho De La Luna, with bands ranging from CKY to Kurt Vile.

Pop Evil

Both guitarists Davey Grahs and Nick Fuelling of Pop Evil are playing identical set-ups consisting of Dual Dark and Rockerverb 100 MKIII 100 watt heads. For their stage volume needs it’s the perfect combo. It’s a loud, LOUD rig and between both the Dual Dark and Rockerverb MKIII they’re able to recreate the full spectrum of Orange tones.

“If sounds were a person, the sound Orange produces would be the Dos Equis guy.” – Davey Grahs