Every month we reward one lucky winner with a prize. This month’s winner receives a Terror Stamp. All you have to do is post your Orange rig to any qualifying social media using the hashtag #OrangeRigOfTheMonth. Please note we are not accepting entries via email.

What’s your name, age, occupation?
Douglas Irvin, 57, Singer/Songwriter/Guitars

How’d you first hear about Orange?
A couple years ago, I attended a Rock and Roll Fantasy Camp performance and noticed the tone of the Orange amps. I preferred the Orange Amp sound compared the other amps being used.

What gear is in this rig?
Crush Pro CR60C 60W Guitar Combo Amp (for acoustic clean tone)
Pedal Baby 100 Power amp, PPC112 60W 1×12 Guitar Speaker Cabinet (for my
assorted pedals)

What do you use your rig for?
Live performance and recording.

How often do you update the rig?
I often update my effect pedals based on the gig.

What guitar do you use? Why?
2017 Ernie Ball St. Vincent, because it is lightweight and sounds good clean or through an overdrive/fuzz pedal. I use a Fender Acoustasonic Telecaster for an acoustic and it is extremely versatile.

When was the first time you saw an Orange amp?
The Black Sabbath video for their song Paranoid.

If you could own any piece of gear, old or new, what would it be and why?
I would like to own a vintage 1960’s telecaster with a Bigsby vibrato. I think it is one of the most piercing and full sounds from a guitarist when used on a lead for a song.

Who is your guitar hero?
Jimmy Page

Can you share any links where people can go to hear how this sounds?
https://www.dvicband.com

11:45 AM – I wake up.

12:30 PM – I actually get out of bed.

12:45 PM – Finished on the toilet. My Crest Edition Headphones haven’t gotten out of bed yet.

1:15 PM – My Crest Edition Headphones finally wake up but they’re super hungover. I bring them a cup of coffee but they’re in a terrible mood. We speak briefly about what they did last night; however, they seem coy. Their attitude worries me. They keep repeating something about how they “hope it’s not on video.”

1:30 PM – I ask if my Crest Edition Headphones are going to work today. They say ‘yes,’ but they want me to call their boss to let him know they won’t be on time. While on the phone with their boss my Crest Edition Headphones are audible in the background, whimpering and crying in between heaves of puking. Their boss exclaims “this is not the first time this has happened” and asks me share the news that my Crest Edition Headphones’ services will no longer be required at Applebee’s.

1:45 PM – My Crest Edition Headphones take the news of their firing surprisingly well. Too well actually. I’m noticing an excitable change in their demeanor. They ask to borrow my car, to which I firmly reply in the negative. A brief shoving match occurs. Nothing too serious though.

2:00 PM – Despite my firm denial, I hear my car tires squealing and run to the window just in time to watch my Crest Edition Headphones barrel down the road and out of sight. I ponder reporting my car stolen to the police but then remember my Crest Edition Headphones already have two strikes. One more strike, especially for grand theft auto, and they’ll be spending the next decade behind bars. I resolve to waiting it out, hoping against hope that my car is returned safe and sound.

5:30 PM – After 3 and a half hours of texting and calling my Crest Edition Headphones finally pick up. There’s a lot of background noise but I can make out the distinct sound of clinking glasses and a rough-voiced bartender calling out orders. It’s obvious that my Crest Edition Headphones have already had too much to drink by the way they’re slurring their words. It’s not even dinner time yet.

6:00 PM – As I’m in the kitchen preparing my Hot Pocket I hear a loud boom from outside. My Crest Edition Headphones are back from the bar and showing off their grandfather’s shotgun to a few “friends” who they invited over. They’ve accidentally fired off a round into the ceiling of the garage, which ricocheted into the hood of my car. It’s barely noticeable, and far from my biggest problem, because my Crest Edition Headphones have run my car straight into the work bench while parking. The front-end is crumpled and the airbag has deployed. A fist-fight ensues, which I lose miserably.

6:15 PM – Bloodied, and with a significant portion of my pride missing, I stumble back into the house to find my Crest Edition Headphones lying on the floor in a pool of they’re own vomit. I take my Hot Pocket and retreat to my bedroom, too tired to even bother wiping the blood from my nose.

7:00 PM – I awake to find my Crest Edition Headphones standing over me, fists clenched, wearing a menacing grin. I begin to ask what’s happening but before I can get the words out they strike, wrapping around my neck. It’s clear that my Crest Edition Headphones, featuring Bluetooth, are trying to strangle me. I ask myself, “is this really how it ends?”

“Not today,” I think. I reach up and pull them from my neck. They stay tightly wrapped around me but now they’re on top of my head. I’m fighting for my life when suddenly I hear what sounds like music playing. The Crest Edition Headphones have cupped themselves over my ears. I reach up in attempt to fight them off but I instead swipe upwards on the controls and the volume of the music goes higher. Much higher. The song is so clear now: The Doobie Brothers “Takin’ It to The Streets.” As my energy drains and I fade into the darkness, I hear the soothing, throaty bass of Michael McDonald’s voice…

Take this message to my brother
You will find him everywhere
Wherever people live together
Tied in poverty’s despair

……..
……..
……..
Takin’ it to the streets.

10:00 PM – I regain consciousness. Everything is blurry, hazy, almost as if I’m in a dream state. Is this a dream? No. It can’t be. This must be reality. The music has stopped.

Was there ever actually music?

In the corner of the room sits an unopened box of Crest Edition Headphones. There’s a note on it. I crawl slowly to the box and pull the note closer to my eyes. In the darkness it’s difficult to read at first. But as my vision begins to adjust, the text begins to sharpen:

“Enjoy these Crest Edition Headphones featuring Bluetooth Technology and up to 27 hours battery life. They have multipoint connectivity and wireless controls.”

Suddenly a cold chill washes over my body.

At the bottom of the note,
scrawled in what appears to be blood,
is written…

“Sincerely,

.

.

.

YOUR DEAD ROOMMATE.”

Use coupon ‘Wireless2’ to get 10% OFF our Crest Edition Headphones (shipping worldwide)

Every month we reward one lucky winner with a prize. This month’s winner receives a white Bax Bangeetar Pre-EQ pedal. All you have to do is post your Orange rig to any qualifying social media using the hashtag #OrangeRigOfTheMonth. Please note we are not accepting entries via email.

What’s your name, age, occupation?
Mike Schmalenberg, age 32, Musician and Elementary School Teacher.

How’d you first hear about Orange?
I first heard about Orange by seeing other bands use them on stage. I always loved the sound, whenever I heard an Orange rig.

What do you use your rig for?
I have played in various bands over the years, Mother Night and Sing The Body Electric, seeing the most action; however it is now primarily used for my solo band project.

How much did this rig set you back?
I bought the amps new, but the cabs second hand, so this rig set me back about $3500 CDN.

How often do you update the rig?
I love trying Orange amps out, so while I try to maintain some consistency with the AD30, and Getaway Driver pedal, I’m always bringing in new heads and amps to play around with!

What gear is in this rig?
My current home set up consists of a PPC212, AD30 and a Getaway Driver pedal; with the option to add a PPC412, or a Dark terror for a little higher gain fun!

What guitar do you use? Why?
I primarily play Gibson, with a Les paul Traditional currently claiming the number one spot. They have always just felt right for me, I especially like the way the brustbucker pickups interact with the AD30!

When was the first time you saw an Orange amp?
I’m sure I saw them while watching an old Oasis video or the Black Sabbath Beat Club performance when I was an early teenager, but Orange really came into the forefront of my world when we played a gig with a band (about 10 years ago) that were using Rockerverbs, and I fell in love with the tone.

If you could own any piece of gear, old or new, what would it be and why?
I would love to get my hands on an OR50, or OR120 either vintage or reissue! I love the vintage fuzzy tones of those amps, they just speak to me whenever I heard a demo; I can only image how good it would sound in real life!

Who is your guitar hero?
The two guitar players that have had the largest impact on me would be Zakk Wylde and fellow Canadian, Devin Townsend. More recently, Jared James Nichols has been a great inspiration to watch as well!

Can you share any links where people can go to hear how this sounds?
https://www.instagram.com/mikeschmalenberg/

Every month we reward one lucky winner with a free pair of O-Edition Headphones. All you have to do is post your Orange rig to any qualifying social media using the hashtag #OrangeRigOfTheMonth. Please note we are not accepting entries via email.

What’s your name, age, occupation?
Reno Gooch, 45, musician, actor, hemp farmer, stage hand.

How’d you first hear about Orange?
When I was a child I saw the Beat Club videos of Black Sabbath and their Orange half stacks all around. It was a turning point for me and the Orange stacks were imprinted into my psyche. Just looking at my half stack takes me back to that feeling of being so excited about music.

What do you use your rig for?
My Oranges are used for performing and recording with my psychedelic fuzz band Space Coke.

How much did this rig set you back?
6 magic beans. Seriously though, I traded something for the Terror Stamp locally. I have 4 orange rigs so to speak, the Rockerverb MKiii 50 and PPC412, I have a Micro Terror with the 1×8, a Terror Stamp and an OR15 with a PPC112. I’m happy to be getting the Orange headphones to go with the Micro and Stamp.

How often do you update the rig?
I will never update my Rockerverb MKiii. It’s the best amp ever I truly believe. I may get a second PPC412 to go with it though! I’m updating the Terror Stamp with the Headphones you’re awarding me.

What gear is in this rig?
For my rig of the month it’s a Terror Stamp alongside my Seeker Effects Iommi styled Rangemaster. The tube preamp let’s me use my gig pedals and listen with headphones (which I now will have thanks to the generous Orange team!)

What guitar do you use? Why?
I have 2 Gibson SGs. A white limited edition with Seymour Duncan Whole Lotta Humbuckers. It sounds amazing and has a thicker neck. Its name is Nuit Ma Ahathoor Hecate Sappho Jezebel Lilith Crowley aka “the white witch.” My other is a black Traditional with stock ’61 pickups. It’s a lefty. I’m lefty but play righty. I like using flipped lefty’s because it puts the controls where I like em. I use SGs because of my heroes Iommi and Sister Rosetta Tharpe.

When was the first time you saw an Orange amp?
The Black Sabbath Beat Club videos. Shortly after that Stevie Wonder live in the 70s. Stevie’s whole band had Oranges everywhere. Man that tells you it ain’t just the looks!

If you could own any piece of gear, old or new, what would it be and why?
That’s a very tough question! I’m gonna pick Sister Rosetta’s 3 pickup white SG.

Who is your guitar hero?
Another impossible question! I’m taking the liberty of saying my main influences all together Helios Creed, Paul Leary, Iommi, Zappa and Hendrix.

Can you share any links where people can go to hear how this sounds?
Spacecoke.bandcamp.com. The Terror Stamp in particular will be on our upcoming LP on Forbidden Place Records. Out early 2021. I will also be posting videos soon on our Instagram page.

The Bax Bangeetar is basically an Orange preamp in op-amp form, coupled with a studio-style Baxandall tone stack active equaliser, in a stompbox enclosure. As a traditional stompbox the Bax Bangeetar is in a class of its own, boasting a unique and hugely versatile gain structure preamp with extensive EQ controls. Dial in an enormous range of overdriven and distorted tones, delivered with a feel and responsiveness rarely found in pedals.

Want to get your hands on one? Well, you can buy it from one of our distributors which you can find here, or enter our Instagram / Facebook competition either here, or here. All you have to do is let us know what your all time favourite riff is, and we’ll pick one lucky winner.

Good luck!

Every month we reward one lucky winner with a free pair of O-Edition Headphones. All you have to do is post your Orange rig to any qualifying social media using the hashtag #OrangeRigOfTheMonth. Please note we are not accepting entries via email.

What’s your name, age, occupation?
Scott Sigler, Author

How’d you first hear about Orange?
I’d always heard about them, but was in London on a trip a few years back and played an Orange bass amp in a music store. I loved the straightforward controls and that big, fat sound. When I needed to find an amp with a small footprint for smaller stages, my buddy Jack Andrad recommended the TB500. Then I found the BT500c, and I was all set!

What do you use your rig for?
Gigging and recording. I run a bi-amp system, with a Lehle Dual SGoS sending a clean bass signal to the bottom BT500c, and an octave-up signal with pedal effects to the top BT500c. I get an awesome sound and a ton of power, yet my amps take up only 15″x15″ of stage space. We often set up one SP212 extension next to the drummer, so he’s got a clear bass signal regardless of the house mix.

How much did this rig set you back?
Probably around $2,750-$3,000. The BT500c, which is now discontinued, is hard to find.

How often do you update the rig?
Rarely. While I add or remove pedals, the stack itself doesn’t change. For bigger gigs, I bring in one or both of the SP212 extension cabs. The combos are heavy but portable. The small size really makes a difference when transporting to a gig.

What gear is in this rig?
Two Orange BT500c combo amps, and two SP212 cabs. Plus pedals. So many pedals.

What guitar do you use? Why?
I primarily use a Sandberg California TM5, because the fat, clear tone through an Orange amp is perfect for my band, Evan Diamond & The Library. Depending on the show or or the song, I also use an Ernie Ball Bongo 5 HS and StingRay 5 (for those clear, grand piano tones), a Rickenbacker 4003s/5 (which gives me a wonderful James Jamerson / Motown sound ), a Carvin LB75 (the neck-through and deep cutaway are killer for upper register stuff and it’s ideal for tapping), a Warwick $$ 5 (for the rawk) and a Warwick Streamer LS5 (which does everything well and is also very light). I use Ernie Ball Super Slinky Cobalt strings.

When was the first time you saw an Orange amp?
I couldn’t say. Probably 10-15 years ago at a Guitar Center somewhere.

If you could own any piece of gear, old or new, what would it be and why?
If I had room for it (and could hire roadies to carry the damn things), the Orange OBC810 with an AD200 head.

Who is your guitar hero?
BASS: Billy Sheehan, Misa, Flea, Clay Gober, Duff McKagan, Phil Lynott, Mike Dirnt, Doug Wimbish, Davey504, Les Claypool, Charles Berthoud and more. I’m partial to bassists who write distinctive, hummable hooks and are audible in the mix. GUITAR: Angus Young, Severiano Wada and Steve Vai.

Can you share any links where people can go to hear how this sounds?
Sadly, we haven’t finished the EP where I used this rig to record, but here’s a video of Evan Diamond & the Library where you can see it in action. Here the band’s Spotify page.

Every month we reward one lucky winner with a free pair of O-Edition Headphones. All you have to do is post your Orange rig to any qualifying social media using the hashtag #OrangeRigOfTheMonth. Please note we are not accepting entries via email.

What’s your name, age, occupation?
Robbie Bergeron, 33, Acoustic Engineer

How’d you first hear about Orange?
Through friends in high school

What do you use your rig for?
Recording, playing out, jamming and writing at home

How much did this rig set you back?
Over $10k

How often do you update the rig?
Always adding

What gear is in this rig?
1972 OR120, Rockerverb 100 MKIII, Matamp GT120MV, 3x 2018-2019 PPC412s, 1975 4×12, various pedals from EQD, Fuzzrocious, Death by Audio, Frost Giant, BAT, Boss, and Line6

What guitar do you use? Why?
Gibson Les Pauls and Dunable

Any purchases your regret in this rig setup and why?
All regrets have been sold haha

Every month we reward one lucky winner with a free pair of O-Edition Headphones. All you have to do is post your Orange rig to any qualifying social media OR email your submission to info@omec.com. Make sure you tag #OrangeRigOfTheMonth in your post!

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What’s your name, age, occupation?
Daniel Eades, 40, Gas Fitter

How’d you first hear about Orange?
Oasis, late 90s

What do you use your rig for?
Recording, gigging and practicing

How much did this rig set you back?
£2800

How often do you update the rig?
Guitars often but amps not so much.

What gear is in this rig?
Orange Thunderverb 200w blood orange and a Dark Terror

What guitar do you use? Why?
Gibson ES 335 for loudness, fender jazz bass for comfortable neck, Gibson Firebird because it looks cool.

Any purchases your regret in this rig setup and why?
No

Can you share any links where people can go to hear how this sounds?
iTunes, YouTube and YouTube

Hi there, Teleport lovers, Danny Gomez here.

Are you staying at home? Well done, let´s turn this home time into something creative that you can take with you on the road when all this ends. Do you want to record at home? This is the way to do it: You’ll need a Teleport (a perfect interface because it’s easy to use and lets you take it on the road and on your pedalboard), a power supply, your laptop or mobile device, and some software and Apps suggestions… Let’s start!

When I developed the OMEC Teleport my ultimate goal was to integrate classic amps and all new technologies easily on my rig, and be able to record, practice at home, use it at studio, for the road and take it to the stage if required, so that´s what I´ll show you

Being able to integrate my laptop and even my mobile devices was simply the next big thing to happen and to use studio grade plugins in conjunction with tube amps, live or recording, with my soon-to-be the OMEC Teleport was a reality for the first time. I connected the audio interface to the Effects Loop´s send and return and the USB cable to my laptop. Done. Now I had the most powerful effect pedal ever with all the possibilities that only a computer can deliver and my studio grade plugins sounding trough my guitar rig.

We are talking about real amps and studio grade level plugins, to me the perfect combination, not just for modulation, you can load IRs and record silently with your amp´s preamp, get polyphonic MIDI with no MIDI pickup, or even load virtual preamps and use them with your amp´s poweramp and speakers… the sky was the limit.

Something like the OMEC Teleport was the most convenient “gate” to the digital domain and back, opening the door for tone “teleportation” (thanks John Denzil Dines for the Teleport´s name), small footprint, super powerful, tone transparent, loaded with a buffer and the right impedance (to transfer all your interpretation playing nuances) and with a footswitch to activate (or not) the tone teleportation services.

To instal the OMEC Teleport is very simple and almost plug and play on every situation (for example in iOS devices is auto assignable), on your Mac it´s just to go system preferences an select it (and check your DAW preferences and settings too just in case), PC requires ASIO4ALL like 99,99% of audio interfaces to improve your machine response and on Android devices it´s just a matter of your operative system (on every upgrade some components tend to be required to adjust but basically it’s just to grant the Teleport USB access).

… let´s check some of my very favourite software/Apps to use:

As a long time Eventide user and artist, using both of their software and contemporary stompboxes (like the H9), I always dreamed to have the same power that I have in my studio machines on my iPhone and being capable of editing my presets at the studio and bring them all, same look, same parameters, on my pocket too. That way I could use my laptop and my phone to get the same super pro results every time and with a class compilant audio interface like the Teleport I could jump from one platform to another smoothly and with no extra software required.

If we are talking about virtual amps Amplitube was the original (and the first to go mobile), with top signature collections (Brian May, Joe Satriani, Dimebag Darrell, etc) and licensed content by some of the biggest names about amps, effects, synths and studio grade plugins (check our Amplitube Orange bundle here). No company has this catalog and sonical possibilities and, again, allowed me to bring the road to the studio and the studio to the road flawlessly, with my Teleport loaded mini pedalboard plus laptop or iOS device.

JamOrigin MIDI Guitar started the polyphonic MIDI with no MIDI pickup revolution time ago but the Teleport brought it to pedalboards and studios worldwide, where a tiny interface and powerful software/App could be required to bring amazingly tracked MIDI info from your regular instrument and cable (or wireless pack), plug and play, five minutes and your enjoying MIDI playing your instrument (if you, like me, are a terrible keyboard player you´ll appreciate this)

Two Notes Audio introduced their Wall Of Sound suite and became the standard in terms of impulse response technology, allowing players to place virtual cabinets in different spaces and move the microphone(s) all around in real time, no need to mess with different files with static mics. moving them quarter of an inch, being unable to distinguish the subtle differences from on to another. Check our virtual Orange cabinets here.

Apple´s Logic Pro is my personal favourite DAW to go, easy, Apple native, superbly integrated into my work flow, but if if you´re into something little less PRO I´d say, go for the equally Apple native Garage Band can do the job seamlessly and, even better, you can take it with you on your iPad or iPhone and import/export the sessions to work remotely and capture ideas on the fly for your final session.

If you´re looking for contemporary guitar tones, with amp and effects not based in classic models but just trying to bring some inspiration to the equation, Neural DSP has an immaculate collection of Archetypes (Plini, Nolly, Abasi) that can bring countless hours of joy to the most exigent musicians. Lush tones for state of the art good looking software that can deliver exactly what you expect from such a players, contemporary tone.

Again, some benefits about a super powerful audio interface on your pedalboard is that after all, this you can bring your whole “studio” with you on the road, you can capture the inspiration anywhere and finish it later in your studio, or add the little details to your superb studio productions on the road… and play live with it all, bringing new sounds and possibilities to your performances on tour.

… with the OMEC Teleport and this vast line of software and Apps you are ready to conquer the studio, the road, the stage and everything in between.

It’s an incredibly simple concept with revolutionary results: go where we’re needed most. Since 1968, Doctors Without Borders (aka MSF/Médecins Sans Frontières) has been tackling one medical crises after another, always remaining impartial and neutral in their treatment methods. The international charitable organization has a rich history of providing medical professions, training, and supplies to war-torn areas and peoples across the globe.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the work performed by Doctors Without Borders is saving countless lives. The organization has been caring for patients, offering health education and mental health support, and providing training for vital infection control measures in health facilities around the world. This pandemic threatens the lives of people around the world, and presents even greater risks in countries with weak or fragile health systems.

Orange Amplifiers is proud to support the mission of Doctors Without Borders. We encourage you, the customer, our extended family, to do the same for this Nobel Peace Prize-winning organization. Donate now to help them respond to the coronavirus pandemic and other emergencies around the world.

If you’re outside the USA, consider donating to the local version of their charity here: https://www.msf.org/donate